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The results of the Peoples’ Climate Vote, the world’s biggest ever survey of public opinion on climate change are published today. Covering 50 countries with over half of the world’s population, the survey includes over half a million people under the age of 18, a key constituency on climate change that is typically unable to vote yet in regular elections. 

Results show that people often want broad climate policies beyond the current state of play. For example, in eight of the ten survey countries with the highest emissions from the power sector, majorities backed more renewable energy. In four out of the five countries with the highest emissions from land-use change and enough data on policy preferences, there was majority support for conserving forests and land. Nine out of ten of the countries with the most urbanized populations backed more use of clean electric cars and buses, or bicycles.  

Four climate policies emerged as the most popular globally:
1. Conservation of forests and land (54% public support);
2. Solar, wind and renewable power (53%);
3. Climate-friendly farming techniques (52%); and
4. Investing more in green businesses and jobs (50%).

Follow our  Library online catalogue latest additions  to learn more on the topics below:

UNCCD Library for you - Monthly newsletters

January 2021 ; February 2021 ; March 2021 ; April 2021

A-B-C

📚   Africa                                      

📚     biodiversity                                      📚   consumption and land use  

📚   Africa 2063 and SDGs  

📚     biodiversity conservation    📚   consumption  

📚  African Studies Centre  (ASC)

Leiden University New titles 

   

📚   Africa/ Sahel opportunities  

📚 📚   covid 19 and the environment  
📚   articles collection 📚 📚   cities and desertification
📚   access to land 📚    business opportunities 📚
📚   arable land 📚 📚   climate change adaptation
📚  advanced search /catalogue 📚 📚   climate change mitigation
📚  agroforestry 📚

📚  Connecting-Africa  ASC 

 Leiden University

📚  arid* (lands, climate, zones ..)   📚 📚

📚  Africabib Leiden University

African social science  

📚 📚
D-E-F

📚   drought                                          

📚   ecological degradation                        

📚   fashion                                    

📚   drylands  

📚   ecosystems restoration  

📚  fibre  

📚 📚  education  SDGs 📚  footprint (land, water, etc)

📚   desertification

📚   energy  

📚  food loss  

📚   drought policy

📚   environmental education

📚  food security  

📚  drylands facts and figures

📚   employment opportunities

📚  food waste  

📚 📚 📚  Fact of the month: Word of the week

📚   databases

📚   expert search / catalogue

📚  forests  

📚

📚  education and SDGs

📚  forest restoration

📚 📚   *education 📚  fashion footprint
G-H-I

📚   gender                                           

📚   health impacts 📚   innovations         

📚   grasslands

📚 Healthy land for healthy people  📚   innovative finance

📚   green growth, finance and jobs 

📚   human health and environmental problems impact 📚   innovative technologies

📚   Great Green Wall

📚  📚   intercropping
📚   gender and forests 📚   health and nutrition 📚
📚   gender balance 📚 📚
📚 📚   human story 📚
📚  gender and access to land 📚  📚
J-K-L
📚   job opportunities 📚 📚   land degradation neutrality
📚 📚      knowledge management          📚   Land Degradation Neutrality Fund
📚   job security 📚 📚   land footprint
📚 📚      knowledge exchange 📚   land investments
📚   journals and serials                     📚   📚   land restoration
📚 📚 📚   Land and health nexus  
    📚   land facts and figures
📚 📚      Kyoto protocol 📚   land tenure
📚 📚 📚   land tenure security
📚 📚 📚   Land Food Feed Fibre
M-N-O
📚   migration 📚 📚   open access
📚 📚   nature-based solutions (NbS) 📚
📚 📚 📚
📚   malnutrition                 📚 📚   organic agriculture
📚 📚   national drought management policies         📚
📚 📚   news articles, web resources 📚
📚 📚   nexus approach 📚   organic carbon stocks                   
P-Q-R
📚   pastoral livelihood systems     📚 📚   rainfed agriculture
📚   pastoralism 📚 📚   resilient cities
📚   participatory approach 📚         📚   resources SDG 5
📚 📚   quantitative (information, methods etc.) 📚   resilience
📚   private investments 📚 📚                   
📚 📚 📚   rangelands
📚 📚 📚  
S-T-U
📚   salinization 📚 📚   urbanization and land               
📚   sand and dust storms (SDS)    
📚   soil health  📚   tourism 📚
📚   Small Island Developing States (SIDS)      📚 📚
📚   small scale farming 📚   traditional knowledge       📚
📚   SDG 15 📚 📚
📚   sustainability 📚 📚
📚   SDGs targets 📚 📚
📚   sustainable land management (SLM) 📚   trade opportunities 📚   UNCCD
📚 The Sahel: Land of Opportunities, Land with a Future    
📚   social contract 📚 📚
📚   soil erosion 📚   training manuals 📚
📚   soil sealing 📚 📚
📚   soil contamination 📚 📚
📚   soil pollution 📚 📚
📚   simple search/ catalogue 📚   tweets library 📚
📚   SDGs resources for education 📚 📚
📚   SDG 5 Gender Equality  📚 📚
V-W-X-Y-Z
📚   vegetation cover                   📚   water footprint 📚   youth unemployment
📚 📚 📚   youth employment 
📚   value chains 📚   water stress 📚   youth and agriculture                            
📚 📚 📚
📚 📚   water harvesting                📚   youth
📚   video recordings 📚 📚
📚 📚 📚   zoonotic diseases

The world has changed. Poised to be a ‘super year’ for biodiversity with various international meetings and the conclusion of the Convention on Biological Diversity’s ten-year Aichi Targets, 2020 will be remembered for very different reasons: catastrophic fires, the COVID-19 pandemic, floods, locust outbreaks, a drastic drop in oil prices and widespread food insecurity. These disruptions will exacerbate the already considerable gap between rich and poor, hitting marginalized groups. Impacts on the environment have been mixed: while the carbon emissions are down, there are also concerns that nature will be forgotten in the rush to rebuild devastated economies. Ultimately, society needs to accept that the future is uncertain, but that action is needed now and start asking these questions:

  • What are the short- and long-term drivers of change?
  • What values should be maintained into the future?
  • What can be done differently over the next five or 30 years?
  • How do we create opportunities and avoid pitfalls?
  • What are the ethical implications of action and inaction?

Considering these dimensions of change provides a foundation for decision-making in spite of uncertainty.  (From “Imagining transformative biodiversity futures”)