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Doughnut Economics. Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist

Doughnut Economics. Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist (Kate Raworth)-seven key ways to fundamentally reframe our understanding of what economics is and does.

Economics is the mother tongue of public policy. It dominates our decision-making for the future, guides multi-billion-dollar investments, and shapes our responses to climate change, inequality, and other environmental and social challenges that define our times. Pity then, or more like disaster, that its fundamental ideas are centuries out of date yet are still taught in college courses worldwide and still used to address critical issues in government and business alike.
That’s why it is time, says renegade economist Kate Raworth, to revise our economic thinking for the 21st century. 
In Doughnut Economics, she sets out seven key ways to fundamentally reframe our understanding of what economics is and does.

About the author:
Kate Raworth is an economist whose research focuses on the unique social and ecological challenges of the 21st century. She is a Senior Visiting Research Associate teaching at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute, and a Senior Associate of the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership. 
Over the last two decades Kate has worked as Senior Researcher at Oxfam, as a co-author of the UN’s Human Development Report at the United Nations Development Programme, and as a Fellow of the Overseas Development Institute in the villages of Zanzibar. 

She has been named by the Guardian as one of the top ten tweeters on economic transformation, follow one of her presentations
You may wish to have a look also at her blog with interesting infographics 
What on Earth is the Doughnut?… Learn more

Here’s a one-minute introduction to the Doughnut.

Since the first iteration of the Doughnut was published by Oxfam in 2012, it has had traction in very diverse places – from the UN General Assembly and the Global Green Growth Forum, to Occupy London.  Why such interest? I think it is because the doughnut is based on the powerful framework of planetary boundaries but adds to it the demands of social justice – and so brings social and environmental concerns together in one single image and approach. It also sets a vision for an equitable and sustainable future, but is silent on the possible pathways for getting there, and so the doughnut acts as a convening space for debating alternative pathways forward.