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Resilience scan April-June 2016: A review of literature, debates and social media activity on resilience

Titled ‘Resilience scan April-June 2016: A review of literature, debates and social media activity on resilience,’ a report by the UK Overseas Development Institute (ODI) summarizes writing and debates in the field of resilience during the second quarter of 2016, focusing primarily on developing countries.

This scan summarises writing and debates in the field of resilience during the second quarter of 2016, focusing primarily on the context of developing countries. The scan will be of particular interest to those implementing resilience projects and policies and those seeking summaries of current debates in resilience thinking. It comprises: insights on improving the business case for investing in resilience; summaries of key blogs, grey literature and academic journal articles on resilience; and the insights from this literature for five characteristics of resilience.

This paper gives insights on the key international policy processes in 2016, analysis of Twitter activity on resilience, and summaries of high impact grey literature and academic journal articles. The final chapter synthesises the insights from literature in terms of five characteristics of resilience  – awareness, diversity, self regulation, integration and adaptiveness.

•• There is a need for increased public and private agricultural investment that specifically targets smallholder farmers and women.
•• There is a need for improved natural resource management and biodiversity protection, which is vital to building resilient agricultural value chains.
•• Livelihood diversification does not necessarily result in increased resilience, particularly in areas with a lack of high-return, non-climate-related livelihood activities.
•• There is a need for an integrated cross-sectoral approach to augmenting weather and climate information systems.
•• Successful and resilient food supply chains feature flexible actors and diversified sources of crops.
Enhanced resilience requires the integration of the value chain approach and climate risk management practices within broader policies and systems.