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Springer Nature - Open access articles -World Water Day Part of the Sustainable Development Goals Programme

This year, the UN World Water Day explores how water and climate change are inextricably linked. Water stocks are under increased pressure as the global population grows and natural resources are depleted; climate change only serves to exacerbate this situation. To mark this day, Springer Nature is delighted to present, as part of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Programme, a collection of research which is directly linked with the SDGs 6 and 13, and that can deepen the understanding of and offer scientific solutions for global water challenges.

The content below focuses on three areas: 1) protecting carbon sinks such as oceans and wetlands; 2) adopting climate-smart agricultural techniques; and 3) increasing the safe reuse of wastewater. We hope this research will provide support to researchers, administrators and all others who work on securing clean water for all. We also welcome your future contribution. Publishing your next project with Springer Nature.

World Water Day 2020 explores how water and climate change are inextricably linked. To mark this day, Springer Nature is delighted to present a collection of research that can deepen the understanding of and offer scientific solutions for global water challenges.
Three field experts in Water and Plant Science added their valuable insights to the collection. Enjoy reading

Free to access offered to all content for a limited time.

Building Resiliency to Climate Change Through Wetland Management and Restoration

From the book Wetlands: Ecosystem Services, Restoration and Wise Use 

Springer 20 px © Springer Nature 2020

Carbon Sequestration and Storage by Wetlands: Implications in the Climate Change Scenario

From the book Restoration of Wetland Ecosystem: A Trajectory Towards a Sustainable Environment

Springer 20 px © Springer Nature 2020

Comparison of carbon cycle between the western Pacific subarctic and subtropical time-series stations: highlights of the K2S1 project

Journal of Oceanography

Springer 20 px © Springer Nature 2020

Effects of Sediment Delivery Changes on Carbon Burial Within the Modern and Abandoned Delta Lobes of the Yellow River, China

Estuaries and Coasts

Springer 20 px © Springer Nature 2020

Emergence of anthropogenic signals in the ocean carbon cycle

Nature Climate Change

Nature Research 25 px © Springer Nature 2020

Expanding Greenland seagrass meadows contribute new sediment carbon sinks

Scientific Reports 

Nature Research 25 px © Springer Nature 2020

Latitudinal limits to the predicted increase of the peatland carbon sink with warming

Nature Climate Change

Nature Research 25 px © Springer Nature 2020

Loss of fixed nitrogen causes net oxygen gain in a warmer future ocean

Nature Communications

Nature Research 25 px © Springer Nature 2020

North Atlantic and sub-Antarctic Ocean temperatures: possible onset of a transient stadial cooling stage

Climatic Change

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Oceanic heat transport into the Arctic under high and low CO2 forcing

Climate Dynamics

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The considerable environmental benefits of seaweed aquaculture in China

Stochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment

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Wetlands as a Carbon Sink: Insight into the Himalayan Region

From the book Carbon Management for Promoting Local Livelihood in the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) Region

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